Regulatory Year in Review

By Peter Kennedy, Special ERISA Advisor, Vestwell

2018 continues to be a year of change – – on the regulatory and legislative fronts. From the now-abandoned DOL fiduciary rule to several other bills making their way through Congress, plan sponsors and advisors should understand how these legislative updates affect them and their qualified retirement plans.

The DOL Fiduciary Rule

Among all of the changes in the retirement industry this year, perhaps the most significant was the DOL’s Fiduciary Advice Rule (A.K.A., “the Rule”).  After much debate, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the Rule in its entirety. And, at least for the time being, advisors are once again subject to the pre-existing rules as to what constitutes “investment advice” under ERISA.

What exactly are these pre-existing rules and what do they mean for advisors and their retirement business? We’re glad you asked. Many advisors under the old 5-part test for investment advice regularly helped clients with 401(k) plan design, investment menus, plan education, and other matters – all without the assumption that they were fiduciaries to the plan. The Rule was meant to alter that assumption by characterizing most types of advice to retirement plans and IRAs as “fiduciary advice.” That meant an advisor would have been subject to significant fiduciary liability, but since the Rule has been vacated, advisors are once again free to offer plan advice with less concern for legal ramifications.

Although not directly related to retirement plan assets like the Rule, the SEC recently proposed the Regulation Best Interest (a.k.a. “RBI”) which would impose a higher standard of conduct for broker/dealers and their associated persons who give securities advice to “retail customers.” RBI is not a replacement of the Rule and is generally considered less stringent. With the DOL’s recently announced plan to re-propose its Fiduciary Advice Rule in 2019, there is more coming from the regulators that will likely affect how to advise retirement plans, their participants, and investors.

Other Legislative Matters

Several other bills could change various rules under the Internal Revenue Code and ERISA. Below are some highlights:

Retirement Enhancement and Security Act (“RESA”)

Probably the most far-reaching – and recipient of the most media attention – RESA would make it easier for small employers to participate in Multiple Employer Plans (MEPs). Other features of the bill would affect rules pertaining to auto-enrollment, nonelective contributions, plan loans, certain nondiscrimination rules, and process for selecting lifetime income providers, all of which are intended to encourage small businesses to offer retirement plans to their employees.

Retirement Lost and Found Act

This act also minimizes the administrative burdens on plan sponsors by easing the requirements on them to locate former employees with small, unclaimed distributions. Locating these so-called “missing participants” can be a tedious and costly process for small businesses and the Act would require the government to create an online resource to find these individuals.

In addition to the legislative matters above, other bills have been proposed that cover a variety of topics including increasing the amount that could be distributed to a former participant without consent, simplifying the complex rules related to offering annuities in qualified retirement plans, and changing the default option for delivering plan information to electronic delivery. Stay tuned in 2019 as we continue to monitor new rules that will impact advisors and their firms…and navigate them together.